This awesome story is making rounds on WhatsApp:

During a robbery in Hong Kong, the bank robber shouted to everyone in the bank:

“Don’t move. The money belongs to the Government. Your life belongs to you.”

Everyone in the bank laid down quietly.

This is called “Mind Changing Concept” Changing the conventional way of thinking.

When a lady lay on the table provocatively, the robber shouted at her:
“Please be civilised! This is a robbery and not a rape!”

This is called “Being Professional”
Focus only on what you are trained to do!

When the bank robbers returned home, the younger robber (MBA trained) told the older robber (who has only completed Year 6 in primary school):
“Big brother, let’s count how much we got.”

The older robber rebutted and said:
“You are very stupid. There is so much money it will take us a long time to count. Tonight, the TV news will tell us how much we robbed from the bank!”

This is called “Experience”
Nowadays, experience is more important than paper qualifications!

After the robbers had left, the bank manager told the bank supervisor to call the police quickly. But the supervisor said to him:
“Wait! Let us take out $10 million from the bank for ourselves and add it to the $70 million that we have previously embezzled from the bank”.

This is called “Swim with the tide”
Converting an unfavorable situation to your advantage!

The supervisor says: “It will be good if there is a robbery every month.”

This is called “Changing priority”
Personal Happiness is more important than your job”.

The next day, the TV news reported that $100 million was taken from the bank. The robbers counted and counted and counted, but they could only count $20 million.

The robbers were very angry and complained:
“We risked our lives and only took $20 million. The bank manager took $80 million with a snap of his fingers. It looks like it is better to be educated than to be a thief!”

This is called “Knowledge is worth as much as gold!”


Subroto BagchiThis article I read in Subroto Bagchi’s Blog,  Subroto Bagchi is best known for co-founding MindTree in 1999 where he started as the Chief Operating Officer. MindTree is among India’s most admired companies across industries. In 2008, Bagchi took on the role of Gardener at MindTree.
She is young, beautiful and just two years into her profession as a software engineer at MindTree. Born into a middle-class family of a scientist from Kerala, she has been living by herself in the bustling city of Bangalore. Her world revolved around her work, her family and of course the hope of building a future for herself with her fiancé – a handsome young man from Assam. They had met through friends. He also happens to be in the Information Technology industry, temporarily on a long-term assignment to the United States. Life could not have been more beautiful; full of hope for someone like her who could ask for little else. Then last week, everything changed.
It happened when she was returning from work, riding home on one of the many Volvo buses plying the city. As she was about to step out of the bus when her stop came, the door inadvertently closed in on her due to driver-error and in a moment, her body was pulled under, the wheels of the bus went over her knees, completely crushing the left leg. In that horrible moment of excruciating pain, she lay screaming under the weight of the bus. People stood around, in shocked inaction. A young woman got down from the bus to see what had happened; she summoned the courage to get people to pull her out from under the bus and then brought her to a hospital for emergency care. The attending doctors realized that the injury was severe and they rushed her to a super-speciality hospital where a series of emergency operations were conducted. Among the many critical procedures, doctors tried to repair the vessels supplying blood to the lower parts of leg so that blood supply could reach the extremities without which there was the danger of gangrene setting in. Unfortunately, the effort did not succeed. The knees had been completely crushed. The devastated parents and a few other relatives came rushing. As she kept her struggle on, a decision had to be taken to amputate the leg without which there could be a serious risk to her life. Time was running out. Finally, everyone consented that the left leg must be amputated above her knees. There was no other way.
The inevitability of that decision will take a lifetime to sink in. Her life has changed forever.
When her fiancé heard about the accident, he rushed back to Bangalore. She was in critical care, alternating between sets of life-saving equipment in the ICU and the multiple trips to the operation theatre under heavy dosage of cocktail anti-biotic and morphine to numb her entire consciousness.
Yet she knew he had come.
But she also knew that for a long time, she would not be able to say anything.
She would not be able to ask him anything.
Ask what?
***
After a couple of days of the accident, I met the young man in my office. With the amputation, the series of plastic surgeries that would follow, the management of pain, the trauma, then the slow process of her rehab and finally getting to use a prosthetic leg to gradually return to the world, it would be one long-haul. He in the meantime, had come to discuss about the formalities related to her employment insurance; issues like who would pay how much and what all needed to get done so that she could get the best care possible. After meeting with my colleagues, he had dropped by to see me. It was clear from his demeanour that he had come back to take charge. As I was talking to him, I could not but admire the courage, the character and the commitment. It was her life. It was his too. If he would have been “practical”, probably even she would understand.
As we parted after the meeting, I shook his hand and I looked into his young, resolute and immensely powerful eyes.
“I admire you“, I told him. He knew what I was talking about.
There was a moment of silence. Then he spoke.
“Nothing changes for me” he said with the firmness of a mountain. I watched him leave.
I know it is going to be another long haul for the one still in the hospital as I write my blog but for now, and for her, I am beginning to dream.

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Remarks by Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com, as delivered to the Class of 2010 Baccalaureate at Princeton University.
May 30, 2010

As a kid, I spent my summers with my grandparents on their ranch in Texas. I helped fix windmills, vaccinate cattle, and do other chores. We also watched soap operas every afternoon, especially “Days of our Lives.” My grandparents belonged to a Caravan Club, a group of Airstream trailer owners who travel together around the U.S. and Canada. And every few summers, we’d join the caravan. We’d hitch up the Airstream trailer to my grandfather’s car, and off we’d go, in a line with 300 other Airstream adventurers. I loved and worshipped my grandparents and I really looked forward to these trips. On one particular trip, I was about 10 years old. I was rolling around in the big bench seat in the back of the car. My grandfather was driving. And my grandmother had the passenger seat. She smoked throughout these trips, and I hated the smell.

At that age, I’d take any excuse to make estimates and do minor arithmetic. I’d calculate our gas mileage — figure out useless statistics on things like grocery spending. I’d been hearing an ad campaign about smoking. I can’t remember the details, but basically the ad said, every puff of a cigarette takes some number of minutes off of your life: I think it might have been two minutes per puff. At any rate, I decided to do the math for my grandmother. I estimated the number of cigarettes per days, estimated the number of puffs per cigarette and so on. When I was satisfied that I’d come up with a reasonable number, I poked my head into the front of the car, tapped my grandmother on the shoulder, and proudly proclaimed, “At two minutes per puff, you’ve taken nine years off your life!”

I have a vivid memory of what happened, and it was not what I expected. I expected to be applauded for my cleverness and arithmetic skills. “Jeff, you’re so smart. You had to have made some tricky estimates, figure out the number of minutes in a year and do some division.” That’s not what happened. Instead, my grandmother burst into tears. I sat in the backseat and did not know what to do. While my grandmother sat crying, my grandfather, who had been driving in silence, pulled over onto the shoulder of the highway. He got out of the car and came around and opened my door and waited for me to follow. Was I in trouble? My grandfather was a highly intelligent, quiet man. He had never said a harsh word to me, and maybe this was to be the first time? Or maybe he would ask that I get back in the car and apologize to my grandmother. I had no experience in this realm with my grandparents and no way to gauge what the consequences might be. We stopped beside the trailer. My grandfather looked at me, and after a bit of silence, he gently and calmly said, “Jeff, one day you’ll understand that it’s harder to be kind than clever.”

What I want to talk to you about today is the difference between gifts and choices. Cleverness is a gift, kindness is a choice. Gifts are easy — they’re given after all. Choices can be hard. You can seduce yourself with your gifts if you’re not careful, and if you do, it’ll probably be to the detriment of your choices.

This is a group with many gifts. I’m sure one of your gifts is the gift of a smart and capable brain. I’m confident that’s the case because admission is competitive and if there weren’t some signs that you’re clever, the dean of admission wouldn’t have let you in.

Your smarts will come in handy because you will travel in a land of marvels. We humans — plodding as we are — will astonish ourselves. We’ll invent ways to generate clean energy and a lot of it. Atom by atom, we’ll assemble tiny machines that will enter cell walls and make repairs. This month comes the extraordinary but also inevitable news that we’ve synthesized life. In the coming years, we’ll not only synthesize it, but we’ll engineer it to specifications. I believe you’ll even see us understand the human brain. Jules Verne, Mark Twain, Galileo, Newton — all the curious from the ages would have wanted to be alive most of all right now. As a civilization, we will have so many gifts, just as you as individuals have so many individual gifts as you sit before me.

How will you use these gifts? And will you take pride in your gifts or pride in your choices?

I got the idea to start Amazon 16 years ago. I came across the fact that Web usage was growing at 2,300 percent per year. I’d never seen or heard of anything that grew that fast, and the idea of building an online bookstore with millions of titles — something that simply couldn’t exist in the physical world — was very exciting to me. I had just turned 30 years old, and I’d been married for a year. I told my wife MacKenzie that I wanted to quit my job and go do this crazy thing that probably wouldn’t work since most startups don’t, and I wasn’t sure what would happen after that. MacKenzie (also a Princeton grad and sitting here in the second row) told me I should go for it. As a young boy, I’d been a garage inventor. I’d invented an automatic gate closer out of cement-filled tires, a solar cooker that didn’t work very well out of an umbrella and tinfoil, baking-pan alarms to entrap my siblings. I’d always wanted to be an inventor, and she wanted me to follow my passion.

I was working at a financial firm in New York City with a bunch of very smart people, and I had a brilliant boss that I much admired. I went to my boss and told him I wanted to start a company selling books on the Internet. He took me on a long walk in Central Park, listened carefully to me, and finally said, “That sounds like a really good idea, but it would be an even better idea for someone who didn’t already have a good job.” That logic made some sense to me, and he convinced me to think about it for 48 hours before making a final decision. Seen in that light, it really was a difficult choice, but ultimately, I decided I had to give it a shot. I didn’t think I’d regret trying and failing. And I suspected I would always be haunted by a decision to not try at all. After much consideration, I took the less safe path to follow my passion, and I’m proud of that choice.

Tomorrow, in a very real sense, your life — the life you author from scratch on your own — begins.

How will you use your gifts? What choices will you make?

Will inertia be your guide, or will you follow your passions?

Will you follow dogma, or will you be original?

Will you choose a life of ease, or a life of service and adventure?

Will you wilt under criticism, or will you follow your convictions?

Will you bluff it out when you’re wrong, or will you apologize?

Will you guard your heart against rejection, or will you act when you fall in love?

Will you play it safe, or will you be a little bit swashbuckling?

When it’s tough, will you give up, or will you be relentless?

Will you be a cynic, or will you be a builder?

Will you be clever at the expense of others, or will you be kind?

I will hazard a prediction. When you are 80 years old, and in a quiet moment of reflection narrating for only yourself the most personal version of your life story, the telling that will be most compact and meaningful will be the series of choices you have made. In the end, we are our choices. Build yourself a great story. Thank you and good luck!

Best Business and Success Lessons

Posted: August 4, 2010 in General

The 73 Best Lessons I’ve Learned for Leadership Success in Business and Life
By Robin Sharma, author of the international bestseller “The Leader Who Had No Title”.

  1. You can really Lead Without a Title.
  2. Knowing what to do and not doing it is the same as not knowing what to do.
  3. Give away what you most wish to receive.
  4. The antidote to stagnation is innovation.
  5. The conversations you are most resisting are the conversations you most need to be having.
  6. Leadership is no longer about position – but passion. It’s no longer about image but impact. This is Leadership 2.0.
  7. The bigger the dream, the more important to the team.
  8. Visionaries see the “impossible” as the inevitable.
  9. All great thinkers are initially ridiculed – and eventually revered.
  10. The more you worry about being applauded by others and making money, the less you’ll focus on doing the great work that will generate applause. And make you money.
  11. To double your net worth, double your self-worth. Because you will never exceed the height of your self-image.
  12. The more messes you allow into your life, the more messes will become a normal (and acceptable) part of your life.
  13. The secret to genius is not genetics but daily practice married with relentless perseverance.
  14. The best leaders lift people up versus tear people down.
  15. The most precious resource for businesspeople is not their time. It’s their energy. Manage it well.
  16. The fears you run from run to you.
  17. The most dangerous place is in your safety zone.
  18. The more you go to your limits, the more your limits will expand.
  19. Every moment in front of a customer is a gorgeous opportunity to live your values.
  20. Be so good at what you do that no one else in the world can do what you do.
  21. You’ll never go wrong in doing what is right.
  22. It generally takes about 10 years to become an overnight sensation.
  23. Never leave the site of a strong idea without doing something to execute around it.
  24. A strong foundation at home sets you up for a strong foundation at work.
  25. Never miss a moment to encourage someone you work with.
  26. Saying “I’ll try” really means “I’m not really committed.”
  27. The secret of passion is purpose.
  28. Do a few things at mastery versus many things at mediocrity.
  29. To have the rewards that very few have, do the things that very few people are willing to do.
  30. Go where no one’s gone and leave a trail of excellence behind you.
  31. Who you are becoming is more important than what you are accumulating.
  32. Accept your teammates for what they are and inspire them to become all they can be.
  33. To triple the growth of your organization, triple the growth of your people.
  34. The best leaders are the most dedicated learners. Read great books daily. Investing in your self-development is the best investment you will ever make.
  35. Other people’s opinions of you are none of your business.
  36. Change is hardest at the beginning, messiest in the middle and best at the end.
  37. Measure your success by your inner scorecard versus an outer one.
  38. Understand the acute difference between the cost of something and the value of something.
  39. Nothing fails like success. Because when you are at the top, it’s so easy to stop doing the very things that brought you to the top.
  40. The best leaders blend courage with compassion.
  41. The less you are like others, the less others will like you.
  42. You’ll never go wrong in doing what’s right.
  43. Excellence in one area is the beginning of excellence in every area.
  44. The real reward for doing your best work is not the money you make but the leader you become.
  45. Passion + production = performance.
  46. The value of getting to your goals lives not in reaching the goal but what the talents/strengths/capabilities the journey reveals to you.
  47. Stand for something. Or else you’ll fall for anything.
  48. Say “thank you” when you’re grateful and “sorry” when you’re wrong.
  49. Make the work you are doing today better than the work you did yesterday.
  50. Small daily – seemingly insignificant – improvements and innovations lead to staggering achievements over time.
  51. Peak performers replace depletion with inspiration on a daily basis.
  52. Take care of your relationships and the sales/money will take care of itself.
  53. You can’t be great if you don’t feel great. Make exceptional health your #1 priority.
  54. Doing the difficult things that you’ve never done awakens the talents you never knew you had.
  55. As we each express our natural genius, we all elevate our world.
  56. Your daily schedule reflects your deepest values.
  57. People do business with people who make them feel special.
  58. All things being equal, the primary competitive advantage of your business will be your ability to grow Leaders Without Titles faster than your industry peers.
  59. Treat people well on your way up and they’ll treat you well on your way down.
  60. Success lies in a masterful consistency around a few fundamentals. It really is simple. Not easy. But simple.
  61. The business (and person) who tries to be everything to everyone ends up being nothing to anyone.
  62. One of the primary tactics for enduring winning is daily learning.
  63. To have everything you want, help as many people as you can possibly find get everything they want.
  64. Understand that a problem is only a problem if you choose to view it as a problem (vs. an opportunity).
  65. Clarity precedes mastery. Craft clear and precise plans/goals/deliverables. And then block out all else.
  66. The best in business spend far more time on learning than in leisure.
  67. Lucky is where skill meets persistence.
  68. The best Leaders Without a Title use their heads and listen to their hearts.
  69. The things that are hardest to do are often the things that are the best to do.
  70. Every single person in the world could be a genius at something, if they practiced it daily for at least ten years (as confirmed by the research of Anders Ericsson and others).
  71. Daily exercise is an insurance policy against future illness. The best Leaders Without Titles are the fittest.
  72. Education is the beginning of transformation. Dedicate yourself to daily learning via books/audios/seminars and coaching.
  73. The quickest way to grow the sales of your business is to grow your people.

[Source: Newsletter ]