Archive for February, 2010


SuccessA young man asked Socrates the secret of Success. Socrates told the young man to meet him near the river the next morning.

They met and Socrates asked the young man to walk with him towards the river.

When the water got up to their neck, Socrates took the young man by surprise and ducked him into the water. The man struggled to get out but Socrates was strong and kept him there until he started turning blue.

The young man struggled hard and finally managed to get out and the first thing he did was to gasp and take deep breath. Socrates asked “What you wanted the most when you were there?” The man replied, “Air”.

Socrates said “that’s the secret to success. When you want success as badly as you wanted air, you will get it. There is no other secret”.


WINNING VERSUS WINNERS

What is the difference between winning and being a winner? Winning is an event. Being a winner is a spirit. Winners have kept winning in perspective based on their value system.

THREE INSPIRATIONAL WINNERS

1. Olympics is a lifetime event. Lawrence Lemieux stopped racing in a yacht race to help a fellow competitor who was in trouble. The whole world was watching. His priority of safety for other people’s lives was greater than his desire to win. Even though he did not win the race, he was a winner. He was honored by kings and queens all over the world because he kept the spirit of the Olympics alive.

2. I heard the story about Reuben Gonzales when he was in the final match of the racquetball tournament. This was an important event and he was playing for the world title. In the final game at match point, Gonzales played a super shot to save point. The referee and the linesman both confirmed that the shot was good and he was declared the winner.

But Gonzales, after a little pause and hesitation, turned back to shake his opponent’s hand and said, “The shot was faulty.” As a result, he lost the serve and eventually, lost the match. Everyone was stunned. Who could imagine that a player with everything officially in his favor, with winning in his pocket, would disqualify himself and lose. When asked why he did it, Gonzales replied, “It was the only thing to do in order to maintain my integrity.” He lost the match, yet he was a winner.

3. A group of salespeople left town for a meeting and told their families they would be back home Friday evening for supper. But as with meetings the way they are, one thing leads to another and they didn’t finish on time. They were delayed and had to catch a flight. They came to the airport just at the last minute, with tickets in hand, and ran, hoping the plane hadn’t departed. While running, one of them hit a table and on the table was a fruit basket. All the fruit got scattered and bruised but they didn’t have time to stop. They kept running and made it to the plane and all of them breathed a sigh of relief that they had made it, except one. He got in touch with his feelings, got
up, said good-bye to his friends and went. What he saw made him glad that he came out. He went to the table that was knocked down and behind the table was a ten-year-old blind girl who was selling the fruits to make a living. He said, “I hope we haven’t ruined your day.” He pulled out $10 from his pocket, handed it to her and said, “This will take care of the fruits,” and he left. The girl couldn’t see what was going on; all she could hear was the footsteps leaving. As the footsteps faded away, she shouted from behind, “Are you God?” He missed his flight but was he a winner? You bet. One can be a winner without a medal and one can be a loser with a medal if winning is not kept in perspective.

WINNING IS AN EVENT; BEING A WINNER IS A SPIRIT

Three people ran a marathon besides hundreds of others. The medal was won by a fourth person. But does that mean that these three people were losers? Not at all. They all went into the race with different objectives. The first one went in to test his endurance and he did and came out better than his expectations. The second wanted to improve on his previous performance, and he did. The third person had never run a marathon in his life. His objective was to complete the race and reach the finish line and he did. What does that tell us? All three with different objectives met them and they were all winners, regardless of who won the medal.

As Mark Twain said, it is better to deserve an honor and not have it than to have it and not deserve it. Because dignity is not in possessing but deserving.
If winning is the only objective, a person may miss out on the internal rewards that come with winning. More important than winning is winning with honor and deserving to have won. It is better to lose honorably than to succeed with dishonesty. Losing honorably may signify lack of preparation but dishonest winning signifies lack of character.

The real test of a person’s character is what he would or would not do if he knew he would never be found out. It is not worth compromising one’s integrity and taking shortcuts to win. You may win a trophy but knowing the truth you can never be a happy person. More important than winning a trophy is being a good human being.

Winners live and work every day as if it were the last day. Because one of these days it is going to be the last and we don’t know which one it is going to be. When they leave, they leave as winners.

There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.
–Michael de Montaigne

[Source: Shiv Khera’s YOU CAN WIN]

WINNING VERSUS WINNERS

What is the difference between winning and being a winner? Winning is an event. Being

a winner is a spirit. Winners have kept winning in perspective based on their value

system.

THREE INSPIRATIONAL WINNERS

1. Olympics is a lifetime event. Lawrence Lemieux stopped racing in a yacht race to help

a fellow competitor who was in trouble. The whole world was watching. His priority of

safety for other people’s lives was greater than his desire to win. Even though he did

not win the race, he was a winner. He was honored by kings and queens all over the

world because he kept the spirit of the Olympics alive.

2. I heard the story about Reuben Gonzales when he was in the final match of the

racquetball tournament. This was an important event and he was playing for the world

title. In the final game at match point, Gonzales played a super shot to save point. The

referee and the linesman both confirmed that the shot was good and he was declared

the winner.


9 Things You Must Absolutely Do To Having Winning Relationships At Work:
1. Act Like a Human

Organizations run by a closed group of executives hovering above in the “C – suite” are falling. Leading Without A Title, where everyone is a key player is the new way to win in business. This fresh method of leading means that leaders not only master the essential skills but also understand how to act human. You can’t treat human beings like capital – you will lose your greatest talent.

Acting human engages people – human engagement facilitates others towards their brilliance. A refreshing burst of humanity at the office outlasts and outshines the paycheck, the office with the view, or driving the company car. As the lights go out on the stage of old-school leadership, acting human is your game-changing solution.

2. Be One of the Few Who Perfect the Endangered Craft

It’s an amazing time to be alive. Revolutionary technological innovation to enhance our lives, freedom of choice to create the life you love, and the daily opportunity to choose from an endless list of beautiful rewards. Yet an insatiable hunger still lingers inside each one of us – the hunger to be heard. I’m talking about the transformative experience that happens when someone truly listens and totally gets where you are at. I’m talking about listening at the level you feel like the listener is hanging onto each one of your words like they are the most important words in the world.

The new leadership is all about relationships with people. And you can’t relate without listening. It’s impossible. Yet engaged listening is a craft rarely mastered by leaders. You can have the most competent leader in the world, but if he doesn’t listen his leadership potential will go unrealized.

Feeding the hunger to be heard brings out the best in people. People will trust you, respect you and shatter their limitations for you when you give them the gift of listening.

3. Be Scarce

We tend to value that which is scarce. We put a premium on objects and experiences we believe will run out: a Limited edition Gucci Ronson sneaker, a two week showing of Michael Jackson’s This Is It. Reserve wine. We are impacted and motivated most by that which we don’t come across everyday or that which comes in a limited supply. If you are seeking to create long term loyalty in your business relationships, ask yourself what is noticeably scarce? Is it generosity? Authenticity? Encouragement? Spot the scarcity and rock it.

4. Be the Most Positive Person in the Room

Today there is perpetual buzz about the state of the economy, the shock of once-admired organizations collapsing before our eyes and the alarming daily rate of bankruptcy. Yes this is current reality however, focusing relentlessly on negativity is subscribing to failure.

Powerful leaders neutralize the infectious cycle of negativity; they deploy hope where it’s seemingly forsaken. Enlisting yourself as the most positive person in the room breaks the binds of negativity. Change the music and people will either stop dancing or start dancing a new step. Either way, it will set a precedence – “negativity is what everybody else is doing – we are the organization that refuses its limitations.” Utilize the power of positivity to step up and make today better than yesterday.

5. Go Bigger than Your Paycheck

Just when we thought Apple couldn’t wow us anymore they showcased innovation with the iPad, the tablet computer. Amazing. You might not love the design but you have to love how Apple delivers surprise above and beyond. Have the audacity to go bigger than your role. If a colleague is struggling to meet a deadline or lagging in productivity, don’t be the first to point out the deficiency, be the first to roll up your sleeves and do whatever it takes to help out. Knock the status quo “it’s not my job” to its knees and do more than you are paid for.

6. Be the Perfect Investment

When it comes to your relationships, be a dream investment: low cost with exceptional high return. Prove to be a no gossip, no games, no regrets, no maintenance investment of other people’s time and focus. Manage yourself with others at the highest level possible – a.k.a with grace.

7. Get Naked in Your Conversations

Make your conversations count. Speak with candor. Brave the real issue. Say only that which is helpful: don’t use your words to criticize or divide. Anybody can do that. Be radically honest, define reality. Trust is born out of the truth. Sloganeering and masking the truth breeds mistrust and disrespect. Go to the difficult truths and people will go the mile with you.

8. Get Famous for Reliability

Next time a teammate or department is unexpectedly riding the wild rapids, be the person out in the water risking the rapids with them. Become known for acts of reliability.

Every single person needs to take ownership of the organization’s results. Everyone needs to take responsibility for what does or does not get accomplished in a day. Anyone can reach success if they consistently do the right things. Reliability, no matter what, is the right thing. Reliability translates into ownership and taking ownership is a way to present yourself as a leader.

9. Turn Everyone Into a Cover Story

Commit to noticing everyone. The young new associate in the elevator on Monday morning, the CFO’s assistant, the receptionist, the customers, the interns… Remember everyone’s contributions, what’s important to her, what he does well, and what makes everyone smile. Everyone is worthy of being the next cover story and leaders show it.

[Robin Sharma]

A heart touching story

Posted: February 6, 2010 in General

Today morning I was reading a book ‘You can win’ by Shiv Khera, this is the one story very touched..
This is the one of  Step to build positive personality:

SHOW CONSIDERATION

One day, a ten-year-old boy went to an ice cream shop, sat at a table and asked the
waitress, “How much is an ice-cream cone?” She said, “seventy-five cents.” The boy
started counting the coins he had in his hand. Then he asked how much a small cup of
ice-cream was. The waitress impatiently replied, “sixty five cents.” The boy said, “I will
have the small ice-cream cup.” He had his ice-cream, paid the bill and left. When the
waitress came to pick up the empty plate, she was touched. Underneath were ten onecent
coins as tip. The little boy had consideration for the waitress before he ordered his
ice-crearn. He showed sensitivity and caring. He thought of others before himself.

If we all thought like the little boy, we would have a great place to live. Show
consideration, courtesy, and politeness. Thoughtfulness shows a caring attitude.