Winning is an event; Being a winner is a spirit

Posted: February 25, 2010 in Collection, General, Passion, Story, Success, Win win

WINNING VERSUS WINNERS

What is the difference between winning and being a winner? Winning is an event. Being a winner is a spirit. Winners have kept winning in perspective based on their value system.

THREE INSPIRATIONAL WINNERS

1. Olympics is a lifetime event. Lawrence Lemieux stopped racing in a yacht race to help a fellow competitor who was in trouble. The whole world was watching. His priority of safety for other people’s lives was greater than his desire to win. Even though he did not win the race, he was a winner. He was honored by kings and queens all over the world because he kept the spirit of the Olympics alive.

2. I heard the story about Reuben Gonzales when he was in the final match of the racquetball tournament. This was an important event and he was playing for the world title. In the final game at match point, Gonzales played a super shot to save point. The referee and the linesman both confirmed that the shot was good and he was declared the winner.

But Gonzales, after a little pause and hesitation, turned back to shake his opponent’s hand and said, “The shot was faulty.” As a result, he lost the serve and eventually, lost the match. Everyone was stunned. Who could imagine that a player with everything officially in his favor, with winning in his pocket, would disqualify himself and lose. When asked why he did it, Gonzales replied, “It was the only thing to do in order to maintain my integrity.” He lost the match, yet he was a winner.

3. A group of salespeople left town for a meeting and told their families they would be back home Friday evening for supper. But as with meetings the way they are, one thing leads to another and they didn’t finish on time. They were delayed and had to catch a flight. They came to the airport just at the last minute, with tickets in hand, and ran, hoping the plane hadn’t departed. While running, one of them hit a table and on the table was a fruit basket. All the fruit got scattered and bruised but they didn’t have time to stop. They kept running and made it to the plane and all of them breathed a sigh of relief that they had made it, except one. He got in touch with his feelings, got
up, said good-bye to his friends and went. What he saw made him glad that he came out. He went to the table that was knocked down and behind the table was a ten-year-old blind girl who was selling the fruits to make a living. He said, “I hope we haven’t ruined your day.” He pulled out $10 from his pocket, handed it to her and said, “This will take care of the fruits,” and he left. The girl couldn’t see what was going on; all she could hear was the footsteps leaving. As the footsteps faded away, she shouted from behind, “Are you God?” He missed his flight but was he a winner? You bet. One can be a winner without a medal and one can be a loser with a medal if winning is not kept in perspective.

WINNING IS AN EVENT; BEING A WINNER IS A SPIRIT

Three people ran a marathon besides hundreds of others. The medal was won by a fourth person. But does that mean that these three people were losers? Not at all. They all went into the race with different objectives. The first one went in to test his endurance and he did and came out better than his expectations. The second wanted to improve on his previous performance, and he did. The third person had never run a marathon in his life. His objective was to complete the race and reach the finish line and he did. What does that tell us? All three with different objectives met them and they were all winners, regardless of who won the medal.

As Mark Twain said, it is better to deserve an honor and not have it than to have it and not deserve it. Because dignity is not in possessing but deserving.
If winning is the only objective, a person may miss out on the internal rewards that come with winning. More important than winning is winning with honor and deserving to have won. It is better to lose honorably than to succeed with dishonesty. Losing honorably may signify lack of preparation but dishonest winning signifies lack of character.

The real test of a person’s character is what he would or would not do if he knew he would never be found out. It is not worth compromising one’s integrity and taking shortcuts to win. You may win a trophy but knowing the truth you can never be a happy person. More important than winning a trophy is being a good human being.

Winners live and work every day as if it were the last day. Because one of these days it is going to be the last and we don’t know which one it is going to be. When they leave, they leave as winners.

There are some defeats more triumphant than victories.
–Michael de Montaigne

[Source: Shiv Khera’s YOU CAN WIN]

WINNING VERSUS WINNERS

What is the difference between winning and being a winner? Winning is an event. Being

a winner is a spirit. Winners have kept winning in perspective based on their value

system.

THREE INSPIRATIONAL WINNERS

1. Olympics is a lifetime event. Lawrence Lemieux stopped racing in a yacht race to help

a fellow competitor who was in trouble. The whole world was watching. His priority of

safety for other people’s lives was greater than his desire to win. Even though he did

not win the race, he was a winner. He was honored by kings and queens all over the

world because he kept the spirit of the Olympics alive.

2. I heard the story about Reuben Gonzales when he was in the final match of the

racquetball tournament. This was an important event and he was playing for the world

title. In the final game at match point, Gonzales played a super shot to save point. The

referee and the linesman both confirmed that the shot was good and he was declared

the winner.

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