Archive for the ‘Love’ Category


Subroto BagchiThis article I read in Subroto Bagchi’s Blog,  Subroto Bagchi is best known for co-founding MindTree in 1999 where he started as the Chief Operating Officer. MindTree is among India’s most admired companies across industries. In 2008, Bagchi took on the role of Gardener at MindTree.
She is young, beautiful and just two years into her profession as a software engineer at MindTree. Born into a middle-class family of a scientist from Kerala, she has been living by herself in the bustling city of Bangalore. Her world revolved around her work, her family and of course the hope of building a future for herself with her fiancé – a handsome young man from Assam. They had met through friends. He also happens to be in the Information Technology industry, temporarily on a long-term assignment to the United States. Life could not have been more beautiful; full of hope for someone like her who could ask for little else. Then last week, everything changed.
It happened when she was returning from work, riding home on one of the many Volvo buses plying the city. As she was about to step out of the bus when her stop came, the door inadvertently closed in on her due to driver-error and in a moment, her body was pulled under, the wheels of the bus went over her knees, completely crushing the left leg. In that horrible moment of excruciating pain, she lay screaming under the weight of the bus. People stood around, in shocked inaction. A young woman got down from the bus to see what had happened; she summoned the courage to get people to pull her out from under the bus and then brought her to a hospital for emergency care. The attending doctors realized that the injury was severe and they rushed her to a super-speciality hospital where a series of emergency operations were conducted. Among the many critical procedures, doctors tried to repair the vessels supplying blood to the lower parts of leg so that blood supply could reach the extremities without which there was the danger of gangrene setting in. Unfortunately, the effort did not succeed. The knees had been completely crushed. The devastated parents and a few other relatives came rushing. As she kept her struggle on, a decision had to be taken to amputate the leg without which there could be a serious risk to her life. Time was running out. Finally, everyone consented that the left leg must be amputated above her knees. There was no other way.
The inevitability of that decision will take a lifetime to sink in. Her life has changed forever.
When her fiancé heard about the accident, he rushed back to Bangalore. She was in critical care, alternating between sets of life-saving equipment in the ICU and the multiple trips to the operation theatre under heavy dosage of cocktail anti-biotic and morphine to numb her entire consciousness.
Yet she knew he had come.
But she also knew that for a long time, she would not be able to say anything.
She would not be able to ask him anything.
Ask what?
***
After a couple of days of the accident, I met the young man in my office. With the amputation, the series of plastic surgeries that would follow, the management of pain, the trauma, then the slow process of her rehab and finally getting to use a prosthetic leg to gradually return to the world, it would be one long-haul. He in the meantime, had come to discuss about the formalities related to her employment insurance; issues like who would pay how much and what all needed to get done so that she could get the best care possible. After meeting with my colleagues, he had dropped by to see me. It was clear from his demeanour that he had come back to take charge. As I was talking to him, I could not but admire the courage, the character and the commitment. It was her life. It was his too. If he would have been “practical”, probably even she would understand.
As we parted after the meeting, I shook his hand and I looked into his young, resolute and immensely powerful eyes.
“I admire you“, I told him. He knew what I was talking about.
There was a moment of silence. Then he spoke.
“Nothing changes for me” he said with the firmness of a mountain. I watched him leave.
I know it is going to be another long haul for the one still in the hospital as I write my blog but for now, and for her, I am beginning to dream.

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A small story with a thought for life!

An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer, a building contractor, of his plans to leave the house building business and live a more leisurely life with his wife enjoying his extended family. He would miss the paycheck, but he needed to retire. They could get by.

His employer was sorry to see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor. The carpenter said yes, but it was easy to see that his heart was no longer in his work. He had lost his enthusiasm and had resorted to shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end his career.

When the carpenter finished his work and his boss came to inspect the new house, the contractor handed the front-door key to the carpenter. “This is your house,” he said, “my gift to you.”
What a shock! What a shame! If he had only known he was building his own house, he would have done it all so differently. Now he had to live in the home he had built none too well.

So it is with us. We build our lives in a distracted way, reacting rather than acting, willing to put up less than the best. At important points we do not give the job our best effort. Then with a shock we look at the situation we have created and find that we are now living in the house we have built for ourselves. If we had realized, we would have done it differently.

Think of yourself as the carpenter. Think about your house. Each day you hammer a nail, place a board, or erect a wall. Build wisely. It is the only life you will ever build. Even if you live it for only one day more, that day deserves to be lived graciously and with dignity.

The plaque on the wall says, “Life is a do-it-yourself project.” Who could say it more clearly? Your life today is the result of your attitudes and choices in the past. Your life tomorrow will be the result.

I hope this story can make us think about our life in different and that too in a positive manner…..

[Source: cite]


The professor stood before his class of 30 senior molecular biology students, about to pass out the final exam. ‘I have been privileged to be your instructor this semester, and I know how hard you have all worked to prepare for this test. I also know most of you are off to medical school or grad school next fall,’ he said to them.

‘I am well aware of how much pressure you are under to keep your GPAs up, and because I know you are all capable of understanding this material, I am prepared to offer an automatic ‘B’ to anyone who would prefer not to take the final.’

The relief was audible as a number of students jumped up to thank the professor and departed from class. The professor looked at the handful of students who remained, and offered again, ‘Any other takers? This is your last opportunity.’ One more student decided to go.

Seven students remained. The professor closed the door and took attendance. Then he handed out the final exam. There were two sentences typed on the paper:

‘Congratulations, you have just received an ‘A’ in this class. Keep believing in yourself.’

I never had a professor who gave a test like that. It may seem like the easy way out of grading a bunch of exams, but it’s a test that any teacher in any discipline could and should give. Students who don’t have confidence in what they’ve learned are ‘B’ students at best.

The same is true for students of real life. The ‘A’ students are those who believe in what they’re doing because they’ve learned from both successes and failures. They’ve absorbed life’s lessons, whether from formal education or the school of hard knocks, and become better people.

Those are the people who you look for when you’re hiring or promoting, and the ones you keep if you’re downsizing. Your organisation needs their brand of thinking.

Psychologists say that by the age of two, 50 percent of what we ever believe about ourselves has been formed; by age six, 60 percent, and at eight years, 80 percent. Wouldn’t you love to have the energy and optimism of a little kid? There is nothing you couldn’t do or learn or be.

But you’re a big kid now, and you realise you have some limits. Don’t let the biggest limit be yourself. Take your cue from Sir Edmund Hillary, the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest: ‘It’s not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves.’

Believing in yourself comes from knowing what you are really capable of doing. When it’s your turn to step up to the plate, realise that you won’t hit a home run every time. Baseball superstar Mickey Mantle struck out more than 1,700 times, but it didn’t stop him from excelling at baseball. He believed in himself, and he knew his fans believed in him.

Surround yourself with positive people – they know the importance of confidence and will help you keep focused on what you can do instead of what you can’t. Who you surround yourself with is who you become.

Never stop learning! I would work this advice into every column if I could; it’s that important. Don’t limit yourself only to work-related classes, either. Learn everything about every subject that you can. When you know what you’re talking about, it shows.

Be very careful not to confuse confidence with a big ego. If you want people to believe in you, you also have to believe in them. Understand well that those around you also have much to contribute, and they deserve your support. Without faith in yourself and others, success is impossible

[Source : CRK]


Steps For Building Positive Attitude: by Shiv Khera

Step 1:    Change focus – look for the positive – Most people find what they are looking for. If they are looking for friendship, happiness and the positive, that is what they get. If they are looking for fights or indifference, then that is what they get.

Step 2:  Make a habit of doing it now – Life is not a dress rehearsal. I don’t care what philosophy you believe in–we have got only one shot at this game called life. The stakes are too high. The stakes are the future generations.

Step 3:  Develop an attitude of gratitude – Count your blessings, not your troubles. Take time to smell the roses.

Step 4:  Get into a continuous education program – Spend so much time improving yourself that you have no time left to criticize others.

Step 5:   Build a positive self-esteem – If you want to build positive self-esteem quickly, one of the fastest ways is to do something for others who cannot repay you in cash or kind.

Step 6:  Stay away from negative influences –  A person’s character is not only judged by the company he keeps, but also by the company he avoids.

Step 7:  Learn to like the things that need to be done

Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.

–St. Francis of Assisi

Step 8:  Start your day with a positive

“If you are going to change your life, you need to start immediately and do it flamboyantly.”